Its a known fact that Australia loves pets. With 62% of our houselds having pets, we have the highest rates of household pet ownerships in the world. In Queensland alone, 39% of houses have a dog, 24% a cat and 12% have both. However, only 10% of our rentals allow pets." />
Renters are Peeved about Current Pet Ban
26Jun

Renters are Peeved about Current Pet Ban

Its a known fact that Australia loves pets. With 62% of our houselds having pets, we have the highest rates of household pet ownerships in the world. In Queensland alone, 39% of houses have a dog, 24% a cat and 12% have both. However, only 10% of our rentals allow pets.



Whether a pet should be allowed to live in a rental property, we believe depends on the owners and tenants. Meaning that at the end of the day, the decision of whether pets can be kept on a property should be negotiated between the owner and potential tenant. Though there's no hard facts, but the RTA estimated that 30% of pets are surrended to the RSPCA when their owner's living arrangements change. RSPCA Queensland spokesperson Micheal Beatty tells Domain that 'It's very fustrating. We have enough trouble dealing with unwanted animals, let alone the wanted animals.'

Reasons for this are largely because of the potential damage to the property, from garden damage to attracting pests, there is risk for the owner when they allow pets to live on their property. But Domain states that the fear of this 'damage' compelling owners to say "no" may be out of proportion to actual reality. In reality, Domain say that quality property management, through keeping on top of routine inspections is important for minising damage to the property.



RTA predicts that due to the large supply of Apartments in Australia, a large proportion of these properties are likely to end up as rentals. This would mean for tougher competition to attract tenants. Through alienating this large portion of tenants, when the power of the tenants becomes higher can be an issue for owners.

On May 31st of 2018, City South News wrote on the topic stating that more insurance companies should be offering pet insurace for owners. They also mention pet bonds. In West Australia, a landlord can ask for a pet bond for up to $260, but this is not legal in any other Australian state. 

 
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