Australia has been in transition for some time now. Over the years, newly discovered technology and communication methods have allowed us to step away from old ideals as we seek newfound independence and lifestyles that ‘feel right’ to us as individuals. Let’s reminisce and look at how the average Australian has evolved over the years.

" />
The Evolution of Australian Households
19Jun

The Evolution of Australian Households

Australia has been in transition for some time now. Over the years, newly discovered technology and communication methods have allowed us to step away from old ideals as we seek newfound independence and lifestyles that ‘feel right’ to us as individuals. Let’s reminisce and look at how the average Australian has evolved over the years.

Seventies to Eighties

Travel back forty to fifty years, and we’re in the 70’s and 80’s. Television was around but you wouldn’t be able to record your favourite shows. In 1981, 60% of Young Australians own their own home and women were increasingly embracing post-secondary education and entering the workforce. Because of these new aspirations, marriage and parenthood has begun to be delayed. Values were shared amongst many, with 23% of marriages preceded by cohabitation and 43% of mothers in a type of paid work.

Nineties to Noughties

The next two decades saw larger change, with mobile phones starting to make their appearance. While 1999 brought us the ability to record our favourite shows, we still weren’t able to watch a video on our daily commute. Women continued to change things up as it became the norm for mothers to be in paid work. Relationship values also began to evolve as 78% of married couples had decided to live together prior to their weddings and the number of couples living together with children are equal to that without. In 2006, the ‘typical Australian’ owned their house outright.

Now

Now, we can say one thing for sure. There’s no longer an ‘average’ Aussie family. Lately we see fewer of us are getting married and more of us are classifying ourselves to have ‘no religion’.  By 2011, the number of 25-34 year olds owning their own house decreased to 47%. While a higher portion of young Australians have begun living with their parents, largely because of the affordability associated with living alone. Overall, the ‘typical’ Australian home is owned with a mortgage, however each state has it own classification of 'typical' household. Our workplaces are constantly evolving, to adjust to changes in technology and employees’ values.  Australia is increasingly becoming a more multicultural country as one third of Australians have been born overseas. In 2016, there were 300 separately identified languages in Australian households. 

Return to all posts